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ryandejonghe

Ryan DeJonghe - The Avid Reader

I didn't always read, but that changed in June of 2013. I dropped the unnecessary stuff and picked up the awesome stuff--like reading! I started posting my reviews on Amazon and within a few months rose to the top 0.1% of reviewers. My reviews then went to Goodreads, and now my blog (http://ryandejonghe.wordpress.com) and Twitter (@Ryan_Reads). If you are reading this, why not leave a comment or send me a note? I love talking to other folks about books and my reviews. Publishers and authors, feel free to drop me a note if you want me to review your book. I usually stick to mainstream publishing, but I'll consider anything. If I review your book, I’ll give you a fair and thorough review and let you know when the review goes live. You can reach me at dejonghes@gmail.com. Happy Reading!
The Big Fat Surprise: Why Meat, Butter, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet - Nina Teicholz

What can I say? I’m blown away by the impeccable research and fact presentation in this book. At first, I thought this would be a mildly interesting book with some interesting insight. Nope. Nina Teicholz brought out the big guns. She lays out her well substantiated thesis and systematically digs in. She “specifically avoided relying upon summary reports which tend to pass along received wisdoms” and she went “back to read all the original studies…in some cases [seeking out] obscure data”. In other words, she meticulously lays out the evidence, slam dunking the point: fat ain’t bad.

 

 

My first instinct for a book that venerablizes one food would villainize another. This sort of happens here; those villains being: sugar, white flour, and refined carbohydrates. Most modern health articles seem to easily coincide with this. More paradoxical: “Our rush to banish animal fats from our diet has exposed us to the health risks of trans fats and oxidizing vegetable oils.” This oxidization of vegetable oils was the big one for me.

 

 

Now, about that yummy fat. Teicholz goes through the history of fat research, presenting hundreds of footnotes, showing how cases of extreme selection bias, selective reporting, and overlooking of methodological problems. Furthermore, these clunky studies were presented to the public by the AHA since 1961 and adopted by the USDA in 1980 as health recommendations. Time magazine put it on their front cover, newspapers proclaimed the goodness of low-fat diets, and everyone bought in wholeheartedly.

 

 

Teicholz turns that tide through her research, not only using the source material, but often going back to interview the original researchers. She proves with the latest and thorough studies “that a higher-fat diet is almost assuredly healthier in every way than one low in fat and high in carbohydrates.” And she doesn’t just leave it there. She includes a plethora of follow-up information and resource links for you to continue your own fact-finding.

 

 

So, yeah, maybe that “steak salad is preferable to a plate of hummus and crackers.” Maybe “a snack of full-fat cheese is better than fruit.” Sounds ludicrous, right? After reading through this well-presented book of studies, don’t be so sure. It makes more sense than ever.

 

 

Thanks to Simon & Schuster for providing me an electronic review copy of this book. Below are some other reviews and articles about this book that you may appreciate:

 

 

Wall Street Journal:

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303678404579533760760481486?mg=reno64-wsj&url=http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303678404579533760760481486.html

 

 

The National Review:

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/377275/saturated-fat-and-skepticism-mona-charen#!

 

 

The Boston Globe:

http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/books/2014/05/03/bibliophiles-ruth-reichl-food-writer/vvVOzTqJv5sISMgQXwP9NK/story.html?s_campaign=sm_tw